INTERVIEW: ELIZABETH WAGGETT

Can you tell us a little about yourself? In 100 words can you tell us what you do, and a little about your process?

I produce large scale drawings through the mediums of graphite, charcoal, ink and layers of precious metal. Three years ago I moved to NYC to start my solo art career. Prior to that I was a teacher of Art and Design which is where much of my classical technique comes from. Composition is key to all my pieces, having worked as a graphic designer, these formal elements really are the start and end to all my pieces. I choose a monochromatic palette as it brings me peace and simultaneously allows the object of study to be brought purely out in its own form without the confusion of color.

You’ve lived and worked all over the world! How does this inspire your work and which single place has inspired you most?

People and places have this way of cultivating themselves in visually divergent and incredibly inspiring ways. So wherever I go, I take a little something of that place with me. All my work focuses on these patterns of humanity. I’ve observed and the way in which we desire, destroy, love and act. I try to take these themes from different cultures and imbue my work with them. In one way or another my work is a reflection of the souls of the places and people I’ve come across throughout the years. While the world is so diverse and there is much more of it to explore, the most inspiring place that still captivates my ideas is Cambodia. From the lush abundant wildlife to the ancient cultures and scars of war, this place shook me to my core and there is still elements I have to process from my time there. The desert brings me the most peace.

What themes do you pursue and why?

My work is all about the confusion of society, the false constructs we allow to govern our lives and the innate desires inside that push us to grow and seek new truths. While our lives are initially defined by the politics, country, religion and family we were born into, our curiosity remains the defining characteristic of where that path takes us. From infancy we are taught to ignore our instinctual understanding of each other and the world. We are boundless, multi-faceted beings and we ceaselessly evolve, remaining in a perpetual state of growth and enlightenment and I want to explain that, visually. No matter where we are, we are all one and all have an innate need to have purpose, we are also guilty of taking everything from religious leaders, to media at face value and allowing ourselves to be blinkered and ignorant of the effect of our own actions. My work tells the narrative of this confusion.

Can you tell us a little about yourself? In 100 words can you tell us what you do, and a little about your process?

I produce large scale drawings through the mediums of graphite, charcoal, ink and layers of precious metal. Three years ago I moved to NYC to start my solo art career. Prior to that I was a teacher of Art and Design which is where much of my classical technique comes from. Composition is key to all my pieces, having worked as a graphic designer, these formal elements really are the start and end to all my pieces. I choose a monochromatic palette as it brings me peace and simultaneously allows the object of study to be brought purely out in its own form without the confusion of color.

You’ve lived and worked all over the world! How does this inspire your work and which single place has inspired you most?

People and places have this way of cultivating themselves in visually divergent and incredibly inspiring ways. So wherever I go, I take a little something of that place with me. All my work focuses on these patterns of humanity. I’ve observed and the way in which we desire, destroy, love and act. I try to take these themes from different cultures and imbue my work with them. In one way or another my work is a reflection of the souls of the places and people I’ve come across throughout the years. While the world is so diverse and there is much more of it to explore, the most inspiring place that still captivates my ideas is Cambodia. From the lush abundant wildlife to the ancient cultures and scars of war, this place shook me to my core and there is still elements I have to process from my time there. The desert brings me the most peace.

What themes do you pursue and why?

My work is all about the confusion of society, the false constructs we allow to govern our lives and the innate desires inside that push us to grow and seek new truths. While our lives are initially defined by the politics, country, religion and family we were born into, our curiosity remains the defining characteristic of where that path takes us. From infancy we are taught to ignore our instinctual understanding of each other and the world. We are boundless, multi-faceted beings and we ceaselessly evolve, remaining in a perpetual state of growth and enlightenment and I want to explain that, visually. No matter where we are, we are all one and all have an innate need to have purpose, we are also guilty of taking everything from religious leaders, to media at face value and allowing ourselves to be blinkered and ignorant of the effect of our own actions. My work tells the narrative of this confusion.

Please tell us about the pieces you are showing In London with ArtLeadHER.

I’m showing three pieces all of which flow and support one another. ‘The Power Within’, ‘The Beginning of the End’ and ‘The End of the Beginning’, all three show the concept in its raw form while hopefully presenting it in a graceful way. The pieces discuss the symbolic value we put on certain creatures and cultural beliefs while also exploring life, death and the afterlife. The ‘value’ that we leave behind, material and legacy and the way in which we conflict those two things.

Lastly, what does it mean to you to be an ArtLeadHER?

This is a world where men have dominated and I certainly don’t think that’s because they’re inherently better artists. This is a graceful way of putting a group of diverse and amazing artists together without bias, providing opportunities that sadly, female artists may not always get.

And while this isn’t about bashing male artists, it is about recognizing the fact that we don’t need to hide behind the fact we are female so people will view our work. Balancing the scale for the sexes for representation in the art world is so important and we have a lot of catching up to do. Supporting those who support you and supporting those who receive no support is of the utmost importance. I’ve made friends and talked with women who’s paths I wouldn’t usually cross, the support is wild being an Art LeadHer.

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